good business

5 Reasons Why Giving Back is Good For Business

Quick note: During the summer, we'll only be publishing one blog post per month as we focus on some new activities and allow you some down time without falling behind on content.

Call it Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), cause marketing, philanthropy, a social impact program, corporate citizenship, or simply giving back—doing good is good for business. From entrepreneurs to corporate giants, it's becoming more clear than ever that giving back is the new black.

But why?

Sure, it's a fine idea to say that incorporating philanthropy and giving strategies into your business is a positive decision. And for decades, many business leaders only thought that cause marketing was a nice PR strategy without a lot of substantive results. But times are a changin', my friend! In fact, I'll give you five reasons why this kind of goodwill is actually a shrewd business move.

5 Reasons Why Giving Back is Good For Business

I get it: The first rule of business is that you have to make money. No surprise there. But what If I told you that you could indeed make money and have a positive impact? Interested?

 

Attract and Retain Customers

According to a 2017 study by Cone Communications, nearly nine-in-10 (88%) Americans say they would buy products from a company leading with purpose.

^^^ I suggest you reread that fact. Go ahead; I'll wait.

Wow—that is an enormous benefit to your bottom line! You want to increase sales? This is one surefire way to do it.

Just think about your own behaviors. I realize that this subject is right up my alley, and may seem like a no-brainer for someone like me. But I have plenty of friends and family members who aren't in this space.

To demonstrate, let's look at an example. I've sold plenty of Warby Parker glasses in my day—and I've never worked for the company. However, people around me have casually mentioned that they're in search of a new pair of glasses. I then ask them if they've heard of WP, and many times, the answer is no. I tell them that WP has an awesome one-for-one model where they donate a pair of glasses to someone in need with every pair sold. And their prices are extremely competitive with many retail brands.

Now my friend has a choice to make: They can go to any retail outlet and pick a pair of glasses off the shelf, or they can purchase from Warby Parker. For many people (about 88% as we noted), it's an easy choice to grab a stylish pair of WP's that will benefit them and someone else. And that's how it works. It's that easy.

Most of us want to believe that we have purchase power. We want to believe that our decisions do make a difference. And, guess what, they do.

Now, let's take into account another aspect of that example: word-of-mouth marketing. <-- This is the one marketing tactic to rule them all. It's better than any form of advertising. It's also the hardest to manufacture. 

That same study by Cone Communications also said that 78% of those surveyed with tell others about companies with a social impact program. Think about it: we all love to share both our positive and negative purchasing decisions. And it's incredibly persuasive. Just consider those Yelp and Amazon reviews you diligently read.

Finally, by partnering with a cause-focused organization, you automatically increase your reach, and in turn, increase sales. That nonprofit or social enterprise will be thrilled to work with you, and probably more than happy to share about the relationship with their own tribe whether there is a direct cost benefit or not.

Attract and Retain Talent

If you've gone through the hiring process for your company, you know that it takes time, effort, and money. And if you've gone through that process repeatedly, you know that it often takes more money to hire and train a new person than it does to retain an employee. This is another jam that being a good corporate citizen can get you out of.

A 2016 survey of Millennials and Gen Z by Deloitte found that an "overwhelming percentage of respondents feel that business success should be measured in terms of more than financial performance (83% and 80%, respectively). They realize profits are both necessary and a priority, but they believe that corporations should set out to achieve a broad balance of objectives that include:

  • Making a positive impact on society and the environment;

  • Creating innovative ideas, products and services;

  • Job creation, career development and improving people’s lives;

  • An emphasis on inclusion and diversity in the workplace."

And, in case you were wondering, according to the US Census, there are 83.1 million Millennials, accounting for one quarter of the country's population, and 61 million Gen Zers. That's a lot of potential employees!

But the important thing to remember here is that, no matter what generation we each fall into, everyone is searching for significance and meaning. And because we spend so much of our lives working, we want those hours to count. You may be in a great position to make that happen.

 

Build and Differentiate Your Brand

We've hit on this a little bit already, but I don't want to skim over the fact that having a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) element can help your brand achieve recognition and stand out. People may either remember your name better, or it may give them some aspect of your brand to search for. You become more memorable, and you'll automatically be associated with a positive image.

Speaking of, and I hope this doesn't happen to you, but there are times when crisis may strike. Your product or service may harm someone, you may make a bad financial decision, or your leadership may fail you. In these instances, one of two things could happen: either your reputation does not recover, or it just takes a hit. In that same survey above from Cone Communications, they found that 67% of people would be more willing to forgive a purpose-driven company if that company makes a misstep versus a traditional company. 

Increase Your Network

Even though I'm an introvert, I love growing my network. I think the more people I know doing good things, the better. I talk to people all the time that probably won't ever become clients, but I'm grateful to know they exist because it may serve a different purpose down the line.

There are so many instances when we tap into our networks:

  • Someone is hiring or needs a job

  • Someone is looking for a volunteer, or wants to volunteer

  • Someone can recommend a product or service

And there are so many more examples! Heck, it's been a very long time since I worked at hospitality public relations firm, but friends still come to me looking for restaurant recommendations.

This happens all the times in our lives, and more so when you're an entrepreneur or small business. We tend to keep our heads down and plow through the day, sometimes only coming up for air when a need arises. In that instance, it's good to know the people who can help you find an immediate solution to your problem or question.

 

Demonstrate Your Personal and Business Values

According to Nonprofits Source, 72% of all giving in 2017 came from individuals ($281 billion). So, if you're reading this, it's highly likely you donated to charity. And that's probably why you're interested in this subject in first place. You want to be more generous.

Corporate giving is just another way to express your personal and business values. And whether you're selling plumbing supplies, photography sessions, homemade cupcakes (Can we be friends?), or software, people want to know there is a living, breathing person behind that logo. Humanizing your brand is your greatest marketing tactic, not that I just want you to think about it that way. 

I know as a business owner (and human) there are things that make you happy and sad. And I'd love to know what that is. Your customers and would-be customers feel the same way.

Giving back through your business is also a great way to support your local economy, which in turns, ends up giving back to you as well. American Express released a survey stating 90% of consumers said that Small Business Saturday has had a positive impact on their community. Just imagine what could happen if we lived this way throughout the year! (And many of us do!)

But supporting your local economy also means bettering the lives of those around you. And when you help people live better lives, make more money, and increase their own profit margins, they'll be in a better position to purchase from you as well. It's the circle of (business) life.

Bonus: Benefits Come Tax Time

if you're just looking at the bottom line, then we can't ignore the fact that charitable giving offers a tax break. You actually get credit from the government for doing good. Yep, Uncle Sam tips his hat to you.

But I firmly believe that even if this is the primary reason you begin giving back, it won't stay that way for long. Generosity is infectious, and once you begin working with a cause and contributing toward solving an issue, you'll learn just what the Grinch did—your heart will only continue to grow.

Before we leave this section, I also want to make a quick note. If getting a tax break isn't important to you at this stage of business, or you have the ability to work with more than one organization, I suggest taking a look at social enterprises.

It's true that some nonprofits are social enterprises, but in my opinion, not all of them are. Many social enterprises are for-profit entities that are directly tied to a cause. I already gave you the example of Warby Parker above, but there are also companies like LSTNTOMS, Sevenly, Gifts For Good, To The Market, and literally thousands of others. And as an emerging business model, there are lots more small businesses like them who could use a volunteer, partner, or sponsor like you. 

For example, my friends here in Atlanta at Dr. Bombay's Underwater Tea Party and Dwell are both very small operations tackling very big issues. They would be delighted to hear from solopreneurs and small businesses looking to play in the social innovation space.

 

What about the little guys?

If you've read this far, you likely fall into one of two camps. The first one is that you are a believer, and just needed the right push to get you started. If this is you, go forth and do good! The second is that you agree with everything that I've said, but you're stuck at the HOW.

Sure, it's great for large companies to incorporate philanthropy and giving strategies, but you're a solopreneur or small business. What can you do? Will you just have to wait until you "make it"?

The grass is always greener, right? It seems much easier if you're making millions of dollars or have hundreds of employees. However, that isn't always true. As a small business, you're more flexible and adaptable. And you're already in a great position for creativity and innovation.

The really good news is that already have enough to give, and you can get started now.

 

No money, no problem.

From volunteering as a team to giving your employees time to volunteer to donating services and products (also called in-kind giving), there are literally hundreds of opportunities for you to give back without breaking the bank. In fact, it may not require any money at all.

However, I do want to interject here and say that being able to donate large sums of money isn't a prerequisite for giving either. Every dollar is appreciated, and if you ask any nonprofit or social enterprise leader, it really does make a difference. (BTW, I asked for you!)

 

Getting Started With Giving

If you're a solopreneur or small business, my best suggestion to begin incorporating philanthropy and giving strategies is to start small. Begin with one relationship and one act.

Make a list of what you have to give, what causes and issues you support, and then find someone working in that space. I recommend that small businesses work with small nonprofits or social enterprises. You'll find a lot of common ground, and also be able to see your impact more easily.

If you don't have an existing relationship with a nonprofit you'd like to work with, attend one of their events, jump on their email list, or take one of the staffers out for coffee. You'll quickly determine if this will be a great fit for both of you.

After that, take baby steps. You (and the organization) may be super exited to get this relationship started, but take the time to date before getting married. Neither of you wants to get in over your heads and leave promises unfulfilled. That will only make it harder for each of you to take this step a second time.

Instead, test the waters, refine, and keep moving forward. You know . . . kinda like running a business.

And if you need help getting your giving strategy off the ground, let me know. I love facilitating good!

Already involved in giving back with your business? I'd love to hear about it in the comments!



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Call it  Corporate Social Responsibility  (CSR), cause marketing, philanthropy, a social impact program, corporate citizenship, or simply giving back—doing good is good for business. From one-woman and one-man shows to corporate giants, it's becoming more clear than ever that  giving back is the new black .

Kristi Porter, founder of Signify

I'm Kristi Porter, and I started Signify to provide writing and consulting services to nonprofits and for-profit organizations with a social mission, primarily through copywriting, marketing, and business communications. I also teach solopreneurs and small businesses how to incorporate philanthropy and giving strategies. I believe that cause-focused organizations are the future of business. You're proof that companies can both make money and do good. And I'm here to help you get noticed and grow. When you succeed, we all win.


7 Lessons From the First Year of Business

I tend to get a little sentimental this time of year. Sure, there's the Fourth of July, which many people across the US celebrate. I, too, am deeply grateful for all of the people who made (and make) our freedom possible. But I also moved into my first solo apartment on a sunny Independence Day weekend in 2003. And last year, I officially launched this business on July 1. So, the beginning of July has many layers of significance for me. Freedom takes on many forms.

Naturally, I've been reflecting a lot on this first year of Signify, which was created to help small nonprofits and social enterprises get noticed and grow through effective marketing and communications. It's been my desire to help cause-focused organizations like these succeed because they are making positive impact on the world. They are the types of businesses I support personally, and now I'm able to support them professionally as well.

So, here are seven lessons that I've learned over the past 12 months. I think you might find them helpful as well, whether you're just starting your organization or need some additional perspective as a seasoned business owner.

7 Lessons From the First Year of Business

1. You must start, and remain, flexible.

One of the hallmarks of tech companies, which continually sets them apart from other businesses, is that they're pretty nimble because their feedback loops are small. Meaning, they put something out there, which isn't necessarily perfect, then they gather feedback, make improvements, and relaunch. They live in this mode.

However, most businesses tend to try and perfect their product or service prior to launch, gather feedback slowly, and then might make some adjustments over time, and eventually relaunch. It's usually at a snail's pace, especially for nonprofits. But if you haven't noticed, your phone's Facebook App is updated every two weeks! They don't wait for major fixes, they test and tweak along the way.

I get it. You don't want to be a tech company. Neither do I. But I think there are some valuable lessons here. Less than six months into Signify, I hired a business coach for a short-term project. I would've actually hired her earlier, but I had to meet certain qualifications to work with her.

One of the first things she told me was rethink my mission slightly. She was afraid I'd narrowed my niche a little too far to be profitable. And it was a good point. So, before I even had a website, I made the shift. It was a relatively small step, but it did make a difference, and has brought in some fantastic additional leads and clients that I might not have had the privilege to work with otherwise. 

Startups tend to bend toward flexibility because almost everything is a learning process. My story above is probably not unlike one of your own. However, startups later become big girl or big boy businesses, and with experience, they tend to slow down in adulthood. I could see myself doing the same because I might feel that I have things "figured out." But the lesson for you and me is keep the mindset of the youngster. Organizations that stay agile are more connected to their audience, willing to learn, and lesson the pains of having to make large changes after heading down the wrong path for too long.

2. Even solopreneurs don't work completely alone.

When you're just starting out, the thought of hiring people, event to do small tasks, seems like an absolute luxury, doesn't it? And today's technology makes it easier than ever to learn things out of your depth, like using Canva to design graphics when you aren't a designer. 

So, most of us cobble everything together, using bandages and duct tape to run our business. We declare it good enough for now, and when we _____(insert milestone), we'll hire someone else to improve it. 

However, the ability to scale your business often means relying on others, and we all started our business to eventually scale, if only by a little bit. My website is built in Squarespace, which prides itself on putting the capability to design a website in the hands of the everyman. And, as a project, I actually designed a simple website for a client in early 2016 using Squarespace. So, I knew my way around it. 

But I also knew there were better things to spend my time on, like working on paid projects and writing my site. And I wanted it to look better than anything I could do myself. So, this was the first thing I hired out. Yes, it was scary because it was a big expense for me, but I've been really happy with it, and again, it allowed me to do tasks that actually paid me rather than spending my time designing a site, and taking much longer than a pro. (Thanks, Madison and Dusty!)

I've also hired an account because I'm world-class terrible with numbers. And I spend a lot of time asking and listening in Facebook groups to learn from others as well. None of us can do everything. It's just not possible. My clients are often looking for the unicorns that can do it all (and I don't blame them), but the truth is, they don't exist. So, be humble enough to learn from others or ask someone else to do the work. You'll relieve a lot of stress when you cross this line.

3. Relationships are everything.

You've already realized this, but sometimes listening to "experts" can be a little misleading. For example, I was under the impression that I would build this business differently than I've built the rest of my career.

There are a lot of people online touting that if you just put great content on your blog and promote it on social media, your email list will just steadily build and those people will become clients. It seems so easy, and guys, I fell for it. #goodmarketing

I have no doubt that this is the case for some people. It has, however, not be the case for me. Instead, I spent years freelancing while I had a full-time job, volunteering, giving free advice, and building long-term relationships. These are the amazing people who have become my clients

When I first started talking about my business, they were excited for me. They asked how they could be a part of it, and were thrilled to have more of my dedicated time—and, low and behold, they were happy to pay me! For the first three months, they sustained Signify. I thought it was incredibly wonderful, but it wouldn't last. I needed to do what those experts said instead. So, I did, and while I've made some great new relationships and a few potential leads, it hasn't been everything those experts said, at least so far.

Six months. Nine months. Now twelve months. My business is still running because of people I know first-hand and referrals. Helping people is an amazing thing. Helping friends is even better. With the exception of two jobs, one of which was at a restaurant, every job I've ever had has come through a personal relationship. So, for me, this new endeavor shouldn't be any different.

Think about who you know. Be good to your friends. Try to be helpful. It will come back around!

And do yourself a favor, and get a mentor if you don't already have one. These relationships have been invaluable for me.

4. To some extent, organization determines your success.

This may seem like an odd inclusion, but getting organized has come up several times over the past year. I'm a pretty organized person by nature. It's just part of my personality. And I can't work in a messy environment, whether that's on my physical desktop or my computer's desktop. However, it's also something I often end up discussing with clients.

I've heard stories of people losing leads because they weren't organized enough to find the right documents to send to these potential clients. They simply took too long, and the lead moved on. And I've known clients who weren't very productive because they were unorganized. It stopped them from making much progress, whether they were gathering sales or donations.

I also worked on a fundraiser that started out fairly disorganized. Employees left the organization, and files were everywhere, changing hands year-to-year, getting scattered throughout the organization along the way. I felt like Gretel chasing crumbs down the hallways. There were a number of things we did differently last year, and organization was one of them. They actually ended up grossing 400% over the previous year in donations! Yes, there were absolutely other big things involved in making last year different than previous years. Otherwise, this girl would be on her way to the millionaire's club. But the staff all noted that organization helped the process feel more smooth and professional. It showed to them, and to donors.

If organization doesn't naturally come to you, I urge you to find a system that works. It doesn't have to work for everyone, but it has to work for you. Your productivity will increase, your stress and that feeling of scrambling will decrease, and you'll look and feel more professional. And I think those are two keys to success.

5. Comparison really does kill.

Theodore Roosevelt said, "Comparison is the thief of joy," and Teddy was right. Recently a friend and I were talking about this subject. It's difficult to look on the internet and see emails, ads, and posts by people who are doing similar things—and thinking they're doing them better.

One of the proposals you have to continually make with your business, whether starting out or just seeking out a new client, is your position. You have to declare what makes you different, which helps build your case.

This is easier on some days than others, depending on your mood or how business has been going lately. But the thing my friend and I reiterated for each other, and what I want you to hear as well, is that what makes your organization different is you. The service or product may be the same or similar to someone else, but no one can take away your individuality. YOU are what you bring to the table. Be confident in that.

(But if you want a few ideas from nonprofits and social enterprises that you can tailor to make your own, take a peek here.)

6. Without strategy, your plans have no purpose.

I'm a huge proponent of strategy, but even I lose my way. (Like, a lot.) It's just so easy to see the To Do list building and get distracted by tasks. But if you never move from small tasks to actually accomplishing your goals, you're just going to spin your wheels. And that's the opposite of progress.

This is actually a series I'm planning to do soon because it's occupied my mind during June. I can't stop thinking about it . . . likely because of this season of reflection that I'm in. And I'm grateful for it. This is a prime time for learning.

To keep your business moving forward, you need a strategy. This may be a marketing strategy, refining your products or services, growth or expansion in general, bringing on additional help, etc. There are a thousand things this could include. You'll have to decide for you. For me, it means adding to my 1) client base for revenue and 2) email list so that I can continue being of help to others through my blog and Special Features, my monthly newsletter. That means I need to make all efforts concerning those two goals a priority, and figure out how to handle everything else. This will likely mean some outsourcing. Again, scary, but good. I'll keep you posted.

Consider your strategies. Are they working? What can you to do improve them?

7. Even in "failure," show yourself some grace.

I have a confession to make. And it's a hard one for me. 

I didn't meet all my goals this year.

A year ago, when I looked forward to this time, I thought I'd be in a different place. I thought I'd have some digital products, an online course, a larger list, more income, etc.

Some of this realization has been difficult for me. As a goal-oriented person, it really is a hard confession to make. You may look at it and think it's no big deal. You may even think that yes, of course, things look different after a year. We can't predict the future. And, if it were you saying these things, I'd say that you're absolutely right.

Sure, these things might not officially be labeled "failures," but they were for me.

It's always different when it comes to ourselves, yes? I've always been my toughest critic. 

During the last year, I've had to adjust goals, timelines, and so much more. Some of these have been incredibly difficult because consistency is the pulpit from which I preach. But I know there was a good reason I made each and every one of these changes. I didn't take them lightly. I had me in mind, and I had you in mind. 

I have to continually remember that I've also had some great successes. I've helped out friends with their projects, launched my website and online presence, improved my health, and sustained myself financially, to name a few.

On the days that I remember my failures, I also have to remember my wins. Not to do so is a disservice to myself and my clients. We've done some great things together. I have to show myself some grace. I'll use the past experiences to propel myself forward.

I encourage you to do the same because the world needs our work. No one else can do it.

Here's to year two! Wishing you abundance and joy as well.

If your organization is new, did any of these surprise you? If you're a seasoned business owner, what other advice would you give?

NOT-SO-SIDE-NOTE: a HUGE thank you to everyone who has supported me over the past 12 months. I have amazing family, friends, and clients. I'm more grateful than I can say! 



PIN THIS POST FOR THE FUTURE:

Here are seven lessons that I've learned, and I think you might find them helpful as well, whether you're just starting your organization or need some additional perspective as a seasoned business owner.

Kristi Porter, founder at www.signify.solutions

I'm Kristi Porter, and I started Signify to provide writing, consulting and strategy services to nonprofits and for-profit organizations with a social mission, primarily through copywriting, marketing and business communications. I believe that cause-focused organizations like yours are the future of business. You're proof that companies can both make money and do good. And I'm here to help you get noticed and grow. When you succeed, we all win.


Celebrating International Women's Day

Today is International Women's Day! So, I thought that one of the best ways I could celebrate would be to highlight women-run organizations that I love, and would love for you to be aware of. And, in keeping with the spirit of this blog, I'll let you know what I like most about their marketing and communications as well.

Highlighting women-run organizations that I love.

Here are 10 that I've chosen, but there are so many more that I could've listed! There are many women out there doing inspiring, and much needed, work. Be sure to check these gals out, and support them in some way, even by just following them on social media or telling a friend.

NONPROFIT

1. Be the Bridge: This budding organization utilizes resources and conversations to further racial reconciliation. They believe that the Church must become a bigger answer to this issue, and are equipping people to host racially diverse small groups that create open lines of communication.

What I like most about their marketing and communications is how grassroots-oriented it is, which fits with their business model. People who are a part of their online and in-person groups have a voice, which creates not only fans, but advocates for the work.

2. TrueNorth Freedom Project: TrueNorth helps individuals, families and ministries navigate our sex-saturated culture through resources and conversations. By learning how to talk about sexual issues with grace and compassion, relationships will be strengthened, kids will be better prepared for the challenges, and the Church will become more effective in leading many to true freedom in Christ.

What I like most about their marketing and communications is their approach. They tackle a very difficult societal issue, but always take the stance of grace over shame, and that always shines through.

3. A21 Campaign: They are fueled by a radical hope—that human beings everywhere will be rescued from bondage and completely restored. They are the abolitionists of the 21st century, and work with you to free slaves and disrupt the demand.  

What I like most about their marketing and communications is that they frequently share survivor stories which makes the need real and urgent.

4. Refuge Coffee Co.: They relentlessly pursues the goal to provide employment and job-training opportunities to resettled refugees, to create a unique, welcoming gathering place in Clarkston, and to tell a more beautiful refugee story to Atlanta.

What I like most about their marketing and communications is that they tell a lot of stories, including the staff and volunteers, neighbors and those who frequent the establishment. Their mission involves being active and present in the community, and that is apparent in all aspects.

5. Thistle Farms: Thistle Farms is a sanctuary for healing for women survivors of abuse, addiction, trafficking and prostitution. They are a community of survivors, advocates, employees, interns, volunteers, and friends from all across the world. They are young and old, women and men. They want to change a culture that still allows human beings to be bought and sold. They believe that in the end, love is the strongest force for change in the world.

What I love most about their marketing and communications is how diverse they've become in their model, which allows them to constantly talk about what they're up to, and a great deal of cross-promotion. Currently, they have Magdalene House, a bath and body care product line, Thistle Stop Cafe, Shared Trade Global Marketplace, The Studios Workshop and the National Education and Training Center.

Honorable mention to: The Mend ProjectWellspring Living, Malala Fund

FOR-PROFIT

1. Dr. Bombay's: One of my favorite spots in Atlanta, this darling little tea shop in the Candler Park neighborhood funds “life scholarships” for girls in India with their Learning Tea program. With these funds, girls can go to college, have a safe place to live, and have all their basic needs provided for. (And her chai is my absolute favorite!) I've actually seen their work in India first-hand.

What I love most about their marketing and communications is how "local" it is. They are good neighbors. Many of their ingredients and offerings come from local or small businesses, and they also place event posters in other area parter businesses as a regular part of their promotions. And the atmosphere is so quirky and unique that it makes a great place for people to take and share photos!

2. Yellow Conference: They are a conference for creative, entrepreneurial women who want to change the world. Bonus that it takes place in Southern California!

What I like most about their marketing and communications is their heart for their community, both in-person and online. They are supportive and encouraging, and always looking for ways to help their fans be better in life, in their jobs, and in the world.

3. So Worth Loving: They are a community of passionate and original individuals who exist to embrace your past and empower your future. They believe no matter your history, past mistakes, religion, career choice, or relationship status, you are worthy of love. And they believe that fashion is the most iconic way to make a statement.

What I love most about their marketing and communications is that they always keep it simple. And it's highly effective! They share the stories of their fans, promote the idea of self-worth, and sell clothing that reminds people that they are worth loving.

4. Business Boutique: This is a fairly new conference that speaks to Christian, women entrepreneurs. They focus on all three aspects of a business: Dreaming, starting and building. 

What I love most about their marketing and communications is the practicality. I left their event feeling informed and resourced in moving forward in my business. And the podcast is a way to continue to soak up the knowledge.

5. The Skimm: A short, daily email telling you all about the day's top political news.

What I love most about their marketing and communications is that its fun! Otherwise, I wouldn't read it, to be honest. I have a hard time connecting with politics and news because it is usually so depressing or mean. They give you the highlights in a compelling way.

Honorable mention to: Joyn, Fashionable, Huffington Post, Raven + Lily

What do you think? Who would you have included? Tell me below!

And happy International Women's Day! #BeBoldForChange



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Highlighting women-run organizations that I love

Kristi Porter, founder at www.signify.solutions

I'm Kristi Porter, and I started Signify to provide writing, consulting and strategy services to nonprofits and for-profit organizations with a social mission, primarily through copywriting, marketing and business communications. I believe that cause-focused organizations like yours are the future of business. You're proof that companies can both make money and do good. And I'm here to help you get noticed and grow. When you succeed, we all win.